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BREEZE FIRE / EXPLOSION Modeling SoftwareHAZ Fire/Explosion

BREEZE HAZ FIRE/EXPLOSION, the most comprehensive package for modeling accidental releases of flammable and explosive chemicals.  This package includes four fire models and four explosion models that can be used to examine radiation/overpressure hazards from various fire/explosion scenarios.  The models are ideal for real-world applications, such as control-room siting at a natural gas refinery, or meeting governmental regulations, such as the US EPA's Risk Management Plan (RMP) ruling.  An overview of each model follows:


Fire Models...
The BREEZE HAZ FIRE models can be used to calculate values of thermal radiation at various user-specified downwind distances from a fire, calculate the distance to user-specified radiation levels, or calculate the dynamic temperature rise of a nearby structure exposed to thermal radiation from a fire in a tank or dike.  There are four fire model scenarios included in this package:

 Confined Pool Fire...originally developed for the Gas Research Institute (GRI), this program models a fire that occurs when liquid is ignited in a confined area such as a dike or a tank.  The dike may be circular or rectangular.  The model calculates the distance to various radiation levels specified by the user and also allows for the calculation of the dynamic temperature rise of a nearby target.

 Unconfined Pool Fire...originally developed for the Gas Research Institute (GRI), this program models a fire that occurs when an unconfined spreading pool of liquefied fuel gas ignites.  The model calculates the distance to various radiation levels specified by the user and calculates the radiation flux as a function of time at a given distance as the pool spreads.

 Jet Fire...originally developed for the Gas Research Institute (GRI), this program models a fire that may result from the leak or rupture of a pipeline containing a compressed or liquefied gas under pressure.  The model calculates the distance to various radiation levels specified by the user and can calculate the dimensions of a high velocity jet flame ensuing from a ruptured pipeline.

 BLEVE... originally developed for the Gas Research Institute (GRI), this program models a fire that may result from the leak or rupture of a pipeline containing a compressed or liquefied gas under pressure.  The model calculates the distance to various radiation levels specified by the user and can calculate the dimensions of a high velocity jet flame ensuing from a ruptured pipeline.


Explosion Models...
The BREEZE HAZ EXPLOSION models can be used to calculate distances to user-specified overpressure levels from single or multiple blast locations.  There are four explosion models included in this package:

 U.S. Army TNT Equivalency...based on the work of the U.S. Army, this model uses a proportional relationship between the flammable mass in the cloud and an equivalent weight of TNT.  The model assumes that the entire flammable mass is involved in the explosion and that the explosion is centered at a single location.  The model uses one of two blast curves, depending upon whether the explosion being modeled is a surface burst or a free-air burst.

 U.K. HSE TNT Equivalency...based on the work of the U.K. Health and Safety Executive (HSE), this model uses a proportional relationship between the flammable mass in the cloud and an equivalent weight of TNT.  It assumes that the entire flammable mass is involved in the explosion and that the explosion is centered at a single location.

 TNO Multi-Energy...this model treats the explosive potential of the vapor cloud as a corresponding number of equivalent fuel-air charges.   The vapor cloud explosion is modeled as a series of sub-blasts with each sub-blast corresponding to a potential blast source within the cloud.

 Baker-Strehlow...based on the work of Baker and Strehlow, this model takes into account the variability of the blast strength by expressing the explosion as a number of fuel-air charges, each with individual characteristics.